Anna Kennedy Online – Autism Awareness Charity
Acclaimed Writer with Autism launches Poetry Book

Acclaimed Writer with Autism launches Poetry Book

Autistic Writer Dr Ian C E Hale launches Illustrated Poetry Book

Dr Ian C E Hale’s new book, titled “Dance with the Desert” can be purchased here www.amazon.com/Dance-Desert-Ian-C-Hale-ebook/dp/B0C9K6PZV4/

Dr Ian C E Hale previously appeared on Womens Radio Station’s: All Things Autism, where he discussed with Anna his latest release at the time, “Asperger’s, Autism & You”.

 

To be clear …. it’s important to put my book and other work into context by knowing a little of their origins. I’m an Autistic person. It’s an indivisible part of who I am as an individual; it informs, goads and limits every thought and act of my life-but I refuse to let it define me. I’m a sportsman, poet, photographer, medical scientist and more-but first and foremost, a human being, with the same fears, hopes, weaknesses and feelings as everyone else.

I’ve Asperger’s Syndrome, with mild Autism, Dyslexia and moderate Dyscalculia. To the best of my knowledge these traits have been passed down through previous generations of the family on my father’s side since the 18th Century. I have found written records: correspondence, diaries, and poetry from family archives of many forebears, their friends and colleagues.

I’m from the historic City of Bristol, England, a member of British Mensa, the World Academy of Medical Science, The Athenian Society and a graduate of Portsmouth, Bristol and Bath Spa Universities. My professional background is in Further and Higher education, SEND and genetics. I have four cats, Tisha, George, Pearl and Thor.

Being an author and private consultant https://policy.onuniverse.com/ in neurodiversity is one thing, but by being one I bring a unique dimension to its understanding and implications, which is one of the main reasons for writing the book-only someone who lives it truly knows what it’s like. This isn’t only academic theory or clinical observation- this is how it lives, good and bad.

I believe that WE are the best judges of what we need and should be involved at every level in all decisions made about us. The book is a definite aid to informing and empowering that goal. Because of that family experience, autism was always a part of everyday life for me. That understanding, combine with my experience, gives my work a unique perspective.

Autism is for life, including senior care, a fact seldom considered by social agencies. No-one “grows out” of Autism; it’s not “a phase”. The vulnerable child grows into a vulnerable adult at all stages of life. That’s the reason why parents and carers worry so much about the future of their children and are often accused of being “fussy” or “over-protective”.

The harsh truth is they are always thinking; “what will happen to MY child when we have passed or are no longer able to protect and speak for them”? That’s my goal-to be the voice for those who have none.

Anna’s guest at Women’s Radio was Dr Ian C E Hale

Anna’s guest at Women’s Radio was Dr Ian C E Hale

Anna’s guest at Women’s Radio was Dr Ian C E Hale

Annas guest at Women’s Radio was Dr Ian C E Hale ​
‘All things Autism” will be aired at 1pm and 1am every day this week.  Please see www.womensradiostation.com

Dr Ian C E Hale shared:

To be clear …. it’s important to put my book and other work into context by knowing a little of their origins. I’m an Autistic person. It’s an indivisible part of who I am as an individual; it informs, goads and limits every thought and act of my life-but I refuse to let it define me. I’m a sportsman, poet, photographer, medical scientist and more-but first and foremost, a human being, with the same fears, hopes, weaknesses and feelings as everyone else.

I’m Asperger’s Syndrome, with mild Autism, Dyslexia and moderate Dyscalculia. To the best of my knowledge these traits have been passed down through previous generations of the family on my father’s side since the 18th Century. I have found written records: correspondence, diaries, and poetry from family archives of many forebears, their friends and colleagues.

I’m from the historic City of Bristol, England, a member of British Mensa, the World Academy of Medical Science, The Athenian Society and a graduate of Portsmouth, Bristol and Bath Spa Universities. My professional background is in Further and Higher education, SEND and genetics. I have four cats, Tisha, George, Pearl and Thor.

Being an author and private consultant https://policy.onuniverse.com/ in neurodiversity is one thing, but by being one I bring a unique dimension to its understanding and implications, which is one of the main reasons for writing the book-only someone who lives it truly knows what it’s like. This isn’t only academic theory or clinical observation- this is how it lives, good and bad.

I believe that WE are the best judges of what we need and should be involved at every level in all decisions made about us. The book is a definite aid to informing and empowering that goal. Because of that family experience, autism was always a part of everyday life for me. That understanding, combine with my experience, gives my work a unique perspective.

Autism is for life, including senior care, a fact seldom considered by social agencies. No-one “grows out” of Autism; it’s not “a phase”. The vulnerable child grows into a vulnerable adult at all stages of life. That’s the reason why parents and carers worry so much about the future of their children and are often accused of being “fussy” or “over-protective”.

The harsh truth is they are always thinking; “what will happen to MY child when we have passed or are no longer able to protect and speak for him/her”? That’s my goal-to be the voice for those who have none.

Mental health awareness week – Paul Isaacs

Mental health awareness week – Paul Isaacs

Mental health awareness week – an article by Paul Isaacs 

Mechanisms Of Mental Health

Mental health is something that can and does change over time, the world moves on regardless and so do you.

Sometimes this is not the internal feeling however this can be influenced by many different, nuanced, person centred and often inter linking factors.

  • Core beliefs (warped worldviews vs. connected authentic outlooks)
  • Self-Reflection (the ability to manage your own selfhood)
  • Information Processing (the way in which the brain filters information)
  • Nervous System Responses (many mental health conditions mean the nervous system is overused)
  • Emotional Regulation (the ability to recognise, filter and mange yours and others emotional frequencies)
  • Environment (caregiving, educational & community)
  • Attachment, Friendship & Relationship Dynamics (poor boundaries, emotional incest, projection & manipulative behaviours)

Everything Is Linked 

These factors (in various guises, degrees, and presentations) will have an impact on someone’s idea of “self”, personal expectations vs. connected one’s, perception of danger and threat, how one internalises their own emotions and healthy spaces for expressing and objective reasoning, boundaries, and healthy modelling of friendships and relationships.

Paul Isaacs 2023

Autism Dance Day 2023

Autism Dance Day 2023

Anna Kennedy Online celebrates Autism Dance Day 2023

We cannot believe it has been twelve years that we have celebrated Autism Dance Day!!!

Benefits of dance and movement for autistic children and adults:

  • Improved attention and concentration.
  • It gives freedom to be expressive of their emotions, using movements.
  • It helps enhance their social interactions and leads to the formation of relationships when placed in groups.
  • A therapist can help people to develop vocabulary skills, using the imitation of the repetitive movements the person engages in.Step in the Right Direction
  • They learn different patterns of movements required for daily activities.
  • Group sessions are best to develop communications and social skills.
  • Choreographed sequences can help in enhancing one’s memory.
  • Touch during therapy helps in reducing sensitivity to physical touch and helps build trust.
  • Improved body image.
  • It helps in developing body awareness and promotes general well-being.
  • Different planes of motion during therapy helps to stimulate verbal communication skills.
  • It also helps to strengthen fine motor skills.
  • It provides a platform for autistic individuals to build upon their social skills, which helps them further to understand the emotions and feeling of other people.
  • They learn to develop empathy.
  • It helps them to learn adaptation to different situations.

So, get your dancing shoes on and strike a pose and have fun!!! #dancelikenooneiswatching

Autism dance day takes place Friday 28th April 2023

Please tag Anna and the charity on Friday #autismdanceday:
Twitter: @Annakennedy1 
Instagram: @annakennedyobe 
Facebook: AnnaKennedyonline 

Please read below quotes below of how dance makes our supporters feel:

How dance makes me feel, it makes feel at ease, alive, and powerful.

It’s the same way when I make music, except I’m not writing words but instead moving to them and doing my own interpretation. Dance to me is basically just music but presenting and releasing my emotions in a non-lyrical form.

Ethan Khumalo

Ambassador

My thoughts become clear and calm, I feel free when I dance.

OJ Bridges

Young Patron

Here at Studio 4 we are an inclusive dance organisation that offer ALL young people and dancers an opportunity to express themselves. We celebrate that being different is COOL and encourage all those we work with to be kind and embrace who they are.

Working with young people with Autism has allowed our practice to evolve and be more inclusive. Teachers and dancers have learnt to be more patient, flexible and considerate of each other’s needs. We are proud to work with many young people with Autism and disabilities.

As an organisation we encourage ALL young people to achieve their absolute best.

Alice Walker

Founder/ Director, Studio 4 Dance CIC, Cornwall

T’mya loves to dance and says it makes her feel happy

T'mya Fyffe

Young Patron

Dancing helps me feel calm less stressed and gives me an energy boost I feel more confident now as I’m not the best dancer, but when I perform i feel it helps me send out positive vibes and it helps with my confidences and improves me emotionally, I feel happy and warm inside especially after a busy day at UNI.

Macauley Elvin

Ambassador

When I’m dancing I feel like me and alive, it also helps keep me healthy as I have a chronic lung condition

Josh Burgess

Young Patron

Pineapple Performing Arts School have had the pleasure of working with many children teens and adults on the autism spectrum, we have experienced such amazing rewards on many levels from seeing the progress, enjoyment and confidence dance gives them.

Good luck to Anna and the team on Autism Dance Day and “Keep Dancing”!

Maggie Paterson

Pineapple Performing Arts School

Dance gives me more confidence, it helps me express myself when I don’t know how to, when I’m stressed it makes me feel happier and helps with all my energy. When I Dance, I feel like I can just be me!!

Callum Kirrage

Young Patron

My passion of dance started from the age of 2 and since then it has given me the chance to express myself within performance as well as meeting fellow performers who’ve embraced dance as a passion or even a career.

Aston Avery

Ambassador

Ever since I was a tiny girl, I’ve seen the world and people in colours. Yellow is the ultimate as for me it means total joy.
When I dance, I feel bright yellow, free and I’m just undiluted Giuliana

Giuliana Wheater

Ambassador

“when you dance, your purpose is not to get to a certain place on the floor. It’s to enjoy each step along the way” Wayne Dyer

Daisy Hutchinson

Young Patron

#autismdanceday A little time to share as a couple … about us .. being us

Dawn and Keith Avery

Charity Champions

Autism Dance Day Campaign
An article from our Ambassador Paul Isaacs – supporting Children’s Mental Health Week 2023

An article from our Ambassador Paul Isaacs – supporting Children’s Mental Health Week 2023

An article from our Ambassador Paul Isaacs
Supporting Children’s Mental Health Week 2023

Children are little people who are developing, growing, and living so maybe connecting the somewhat obvious link to child and mental health is key?

Environmental Cladding

As adults we are a product of one’s environment, belief systems, worldly expectations, concepts of what is “normal” and bias concepts of what is “other”.

Our “World” Through the lenses of others

Core beliefs begin from birth to late infancy they come from people of significance in our lives, their words, their actions and the can delve into the subconscious.

Connecting With Others 

Maybe this is the multifaceted starting point for mental health challenges? attachment to others? Friendships? Future relationships? Our ideas about sexuality and/or sexual relationships.

Perceptual Self or Connected Self?

You could say one is born a “clean slate” foundation wise and with a mixture of nature and nurture (or lack thereof).

One’s ideas of the world start to emerge from observational and situational circumstances

Knowing “You”

Internal growth starts early an adult is a product of their childhood environment.

A journey into the interior is not meant to be a pleasant adventure but it’s worthy if the goal is to find who you really are.

Paul Isaacs 2023

 

https://www.childrensmentalhealthweek.org.uk/

 

 

Tag: Autism